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Prescription Patterns of Antimicrobial Agents for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Patients Visiting the Emergency Department of Kawasaki Medical School Hospital: A Descriptive Study

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a global threat. The need for the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents has been recognized, such as in upper respiratory tract infections. This study aimed to clarify the prescription of antimicrobial agents for upper respiratory tract infections in the Emergency Department of Kawasaki Medical School Hospital. Patients who visited the department from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2016, and were diagnosed with upper respiratory tract infection (common cold, acute upper respiratory tract infection, acute pharyngitis, acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis, acute sinusitis) were included. Excluded were patients who visited non-emergency departments, those under 15 years of age, those transported by ambulance (ambulance, doctor car, doctor helicopter), and those who visited during office hours (8:30-15:30 on weekdays or 8:30-11:00 on Saturdays). A total of 3,920 patients were included in the study, with a median age of 34 years (interquartile range: 25-51 years), and 2007 (51%) were male. Of these, 1,023 patients (26%) were prescribed antimicrobial agents for upper respiratory tract infections. Of the antimicrobial agents prescribed, third-generation cephem antibiotics accounted for more than 40%. In terms of the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents, interventions against prescribing third-generation cephalosporins were considered.

著者名
Yamashita N, et al
47
105-112
DOI
10.11482/KMJ-E2021470105
掲載日
2021.10.5

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